English Vita otome games: a guide

In the years since Hakuoki: Demon of the Fleeting Blossom made its English debut in 2012, otome games have enjoyed a surge of popularity worldwide. The genre went from an unknown to one that received multiple releases on various platforms each year. Sony handhelds have long been a haven for such titles, with people who own a Vita enjoying the fruits of this bevy of releases.

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Nintendo Switch rhythm games: a guide

In many cases, it can take years for a system to accumulate a respectable library of rhythm games. Nintendo’s Switch is not in one of those situations. The system is nearing the end of its first year, and it already has a more than adequate array of available and upcoming games where music is the primary focus.

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What’s up with Ruby Party?

Otome games are only just starting to find their place worldwide, but these dating sims for women have been around for quite some time in Japan. If you start enjoying these titles, you will eventually find yourself hearing about Ruby Party. You may even hear laments about how no Ruby Party games have been localized yet! Who is this developer? Why should you care about its titles? Let’s learn a little more about this studio!

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Preparing for Utano Princesama: Shining Live

Big news in the world of otome games that also happen to have a musical side to them! One is actually receiving a worldwide release! Unfortunately, this is not a story following up on an unexpected La Corda d’Oro localization. Rather, an Uta no Prince-sama mobile game will be released on Android and iOS devices in English about a year after its Japanese debut. This is great news, right? Well, I certainly think it is and am here to tell you why.

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Sega Dreamcast imports guide: The best Japan-only games to play

For a less-successful-than-hoped system approaching two decades of existence, the Dreamcast holds an impressive library of games that just haven’t seen proper follow-ups, and that holds true with the unlocalized segment of its library. The end of the road for Sega’s hardware development was full of both special novelties and Japan-only genre specialties, and the system’s arcade-like approach means a lot of it’s totally playable for Western audiences. Here’s what you shouldn’t miss!

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What do you need to know about Lufia?

Sometimes, RPG series people love are lost to the sands of time. The developers that made them go out of business, other companies decide they are not profitable and age leads to them not getting a digital rerelease via a platform like the Virtual Console. Lufia is one of these series. But, while it is difficult to accumulate a complete collection of these games and get into them now, it is not impossible and many installments are worth your time.

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