The troubled history of Famicom Wars

It’s weird to think of Advance Wars as some sort of series for importers. After all, we’ve seen the last four entries in the West, in some cases several years before they’re released in their original Japanese form. The last title, Days of Ruin, was released in the U.S. and Europe in 2008, after a breakneck localization process that saw completely different English names and conversations in the two regions. Japanese players could buy it… in October 2013. As a digital-only Club Nintendo reward. This is just the latest in the Famicom Wars franchise’s rocky, questionable release history, one sometimes affected by real-life conflict.

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Famicom Wars shows companies don’t need to mess with winning formulas

Nintendo and Intelligent Systems’ Wars series has always been one of the best turn-based strategic experiences you can enjoy on a Nintendo console or handheld. Here’s something that will blow your mind and appreciate the entries in the series that were localized even more. Famicom Wars, the very first installment, contains many of the same mechanics we enjoyed years later in Advance Wars. It’s a classic case of not messing with success.

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A beginner’s guide to Advance Wars

While the Fire Emblem series is experiencing a renaissance, the same can’t be said for its longtime compatriot, Advance Wars. The other strategy franchise from Intelligent Systems has been dormant since 2008! Still, there’s a lot to love in its history, and until we’re given another new one, digging back into those older titles is the way to go. But where should you start? Read on.

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Devil World is so much more diabolical than Pac-Man

Shigeru Miyamoto is an amazing, wonderful, talented genius who appears to want to make people happy with all of his creations. Except Devil World, because Devil World is the most terrifying thing ever. If you haven’t heard of that, then hello fellow US citizens! This Pac-Man-like was only released in Japan and Europe, which means only people in those regions were able to play one of the most terrifying dot-collecting games in existence.

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