Preview: Samurai Warriors: Spirit of Sanada isn’t afraid to get personal

What do you think about first when the Musou series comes to mind? The battle system is always at the forefront for me. I think about the dozens of playable characters that I’ll send hacking and slashing across massive battlefields. Even though I enjoy any and every opportunity to see characters interact with each other in social situations, the fights always feel as though they are at the forefront. Yet, when it comes to my first four hours with Samurai Warriors: Spirit of Sanada, the personal touch feels like the most notable part of this project.

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Review: Operation Babel: New Tokyo Legacy is a questionable undertaking

Operation Babel: New Tokyo Legacy finds itself in a difficult position. It’s an Experience RPG that gives people an opportunity to once again create a party of custom characters and crawl their way through dungeons with a first-person perspective. This is a genre that has done well on the system. However, it is the sequel to Operation Abyss: New Tokyo Legacy, one of the developer’s less exciting games. Seeing as how it doesn’t learn from its predecessors’ mistakes, this may be a legacy that fades into obscurity

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Review: The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky the 3rd is complementary

In Japan, there exists a category of games called fan discs. These can be additional games, but might also focus on forms of media. Their goal? To offer additional insight into a story by providing players with side stories or an epilogue. The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky the 3rd is essentially a massive fan disc for The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky. It not only offers more information regarding Estelle and Joshua, but gives us a chance to learn more about party members or NPCs who might have touched our hearts in the first two games.

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Review: Dragon Quest Heroes II offers hordes of fun

Connection. Dragon Quest Heroes II strives for a cohesive world with lands between towns and battles, for cooperative combat with friends and against large foes, and for compassionate, effusive personalities that interact with energy and wit. It doesn’t want to be a series of battle maps in menus, but rather an experience that feels complete and inseparable.

Don’t worry, though: you can still hit a bunch of monsters with oversized weapons.

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Review: Uncover Suda’s lost past in The Silver Case

Goichi Suda, known to many as Suda51, has become one of the more prolific Japanese game writers and designers around. While he was not particularly well known in North America until the release of the cult classic Killer7, that was far from his first game. This brings us to one of the only Suda titles that never saw release outside of Japan at the time: The Silver Case. Nearly two decades later, the now-localized The Silver Case presents us with a bizarre story full of philosophically-inclined characters and plenty of creepy imagery. So yes, it’s a Suda51 game.

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A Rose in the Twilight says so much without saying a word

There are games that rely heavily on exposition. Nihon Falcom’s The Legend of Heroes line touts its massive amounts of text. Then, there are others that show how little you really need to know to appreciate what’s happening in a game. A Rose in the Twilight is such a game. You go in knowing the bare minimum and are given very little information as you proceed throughout the adventure. Yet, despite this lack of information, it does a wonderful job of making itself understood.

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Review: In A Rose in the Twilight, challenges bloom

Since 2014, Nippon Ichi Software has been releasing a series of games that combine action and puzzle elements with melancholy atmospheres. It all began with htoL#NiQ, led to Yomawari: Night Alone and has now brought us to A Rose in the Twilight. Each one is designed to make us think as we attempt to aid nearly helpless women through unsettling scenarios. With A Rose in the Twilight, we get a game that gets us thinking about mortality and the passage of time in a way that’s nonthreatening and never too grotesque or uncomfortable.

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Toukiden 2’s newest weapons are both traditional and nontraditional

The Toukiden series has always featured these massive games where you’re using the best equipment available to you to fight monsters. As to be expected, new installments means new weapons. With Toukiden 2, the game does something a little special. In introducing the sword and shield and chain whip, people are getting traditional and nontraditional weapons at the same time. As such, it injects practicality and whimsy into the series and encourages two new means of engaging opponents.

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