Review: Disgaea 1 Complete is back to the old grind

A breakout hit that turned into a long-running franchise, the first Disgaea game still holds a certain charm for those who discovered it. Nippon Ichi Software knows it, too: it’s re-released it on tons of platforms and even developed the peculiar Disgaea D2 that was built explicitly as a response to the fandom surrounding the original. Now, that’s led to Disgaea 1 Complete, a release that remasters the visuals of the original while painstakingly retaining the systems and limitations of the debut.

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What else has Cygames made?

Cygames is a company that if you don’t know, you should. Recently, it has gotten a bit of attention due to the worldwide launch of Dragalia Lost, an action-RPG it made with Nintendo. But that is not all the company has been working on. It has been taking over Japan with its mobile games, easing its way into console titles and other projects. If you are not paying attention yet, you should be.

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Review: Final Fantasy XV Pocket Edition HD knows what is important

Final Fantasy XV is a game that spent 10 years in development. Once it launched in 2016, Square Enix seemed determined to put as much effort as it possibly could to ensure the gaming world knew its name and went through the game. Part of this involves a DLC plan that extends its influence into 2019 with Ardyn, Aranea, Luna and Noctis add-on episodes, but the more interesting element is Final Fantasy XV Pocket Edition, which is essentially the Reader’s Digest Condensed Book version of the console game. With the debut of Final Fantasy XV Pocket Edition HD on the Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, players are seeing the most economical and time-friendly adaptation of a game Square Enix is trying to ensure everyone sees.

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Which Steins;Gate version is best for you?

Steins;Gate has really exploded in popularity over the years. What once was an Xbox 360-exclusive visual novel has seen worldwide success. Even its sequels and other media projects are available outside of Japan. It is a big deal. But, you also have to consider how many platforms it is or will soon be available on. Which release might be best for you? How should you be playing it? Well, let’s look through the different versions and help you decide.

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Review: Valkyria Chronicles 4 refines the art of war

After two PSP sequels and middling success in the West, there was a long period of quiet for Valkyria Chronicles. Revered by those who played it, it was set to fade away like so many franchises before it. Thankfully, it found a larger audience on PC and PS4, and this unlikely fourth game became reality.

There’s a lot of pressure on a project that comes about like this, and the first Valkyria Chronicles casts a long shadow. Thankfully, Valkyria Chronicles 4 more than lives up to the legacy.

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Review: SNK Heroines: Tag Team Frenzy’s “fetishism explosion” is full of polarizing choices

The appeal of a fighting game can be all sorts of things. It can be about mechanical complexity, gorgeous animation, intense matches, speed or big combos, as well as any number of other aspects of the game. The importance of the appeal, though, is that the rest of the game builds around it, and that it’s indelibly defined by this one particular selling point. The game is its appeal.

SNK Heroines: Tag Team Frenzy certainly isn’t an exception, but its chosen appeal is… something.

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Japanese games can help bring myths to life

How do you introduce people to folklore and fairy tales? Introducing people to mythology can be easy when they are young or in school, as such stories can sometimes be used to teach morals, introduce concepts that might be difficult for people to otherwise understand, act as warnings and get imaginations working. Once folks get older, it can be more difficult to get them engaged and interested in legends. Fortunately, some Japanese video games can step in to bridge the gap.

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What are sound novels and kinetic novels?

Visual novels went from being a rare genre outside of Japan to one we see appearing on major consoles! This is great news, but it also means that there can be some ambiguity. Lots of games are having the “visual novel” label applied to them. Which is fine for beginners, but it does not really show how distinct and unique some games can be. There are different categories falling under the visual novel umbrella, after all. With games like Nekopara and 428: Shibuya Scramble finding their ways to consoles, now is a great time to go over the different kinds of visual novels, so you can be better informed before you start reading!

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