Collar x Malice constantly showcases the red oni/blue oni dynamic

There is a trend people may have noticed in Japanese games. It is a phenomenon known as red oni and blue oni. In Japanese folklore, there would always be two different kinds of oni, one who was red and one who was blue. Various elemental qualities and personalities became associated with the type, with the red oni being a fiery and passionate man of action and the blue oni being more calm, logical and stoic. The concept became pervasive, with such pairs appearing in all sorts of media. Collar x Malice, Aksys and Idea Factory’s latest visual novel, gives people one of the clearest examples of the red oni and blue oni dynamic.

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Collar x Malice makes you feel good about bad ends

Bad ends are everywhere in Collar x Malice. Almost immediately after Adonis, the terrorist group, places the life-threatening collar around the heroine’s neck, you can run into one. She meets her superior in the police department, Masanobu Mochida, and has the option of hiding what happened or telling him everything. Choosing the latter causes Adonis to inject her with the lethal poison and the game to end. What a buzzkill, right?

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Review: Collar x Malice aims at your heart

There are two kinds of otome games. The first are titles where the romance comes first, and the story exists to further the relationships. The second are ones where the tale a title tells takes priority, and the romance is an incidental that happens along the way. Amnesia: Memories is a good example of the former, while Hakuoki showcases the latter. Collar x Malice is another game where the narrative needs and gets the most attention. This doesn’t make the relationships between characters any less satisfying, but does mean the adventure might not be as appealing to some members of its audience.

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Figuring out what to do in Airship Q

Airship Q, better known to PC owners as Wondership Q, is one of those games that seems as though it might avoid a Vita launch worldwide. Fortunately, an English patch for the Asian releases means anyone could import a copy of this game, which usually runs for under $20, and enjoy it. While it seems like Terraria with cat people, there’s actually much more to it than that. But, don’t let that confuse you. While there is greater progression here, success comes from endlessly exploring and mining.

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The weird world of Danganronpa: a starter guide

2017 is a big year for the Danganronpa series. The first two games made their way to the PlayStation 4, Danganronpa Another Episode: Ultra Despair Girls showed up on the PlayStation 4 and PC, a tech demo made its way to the PlayStation VR worldwide and the third installment is showing up everywhere in every region this year. This means it is a good time to consider enrolling in Hope’s Peak Academy. School is in session!

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The proliferation of Persona-likes

When Atlus released Persona 3, it hit upon a formula that resonated with people. Players were doing the typical “save the world” thing, but in a modern environment that required them to also interact with other people and maintain something of a normal life when they weren’t involved in dungeon-crawling and life-or-death battles. In the years since, we’ve seen multiple games that attempt to capture the magic of the Persona series.

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